Marijuana

Marijuana

The ratification of Amendment 64 — which legalized cannabis in Colorado — once again showed that our state is a national leader when it comes to innovative, progressive solutions. Legalizing marijuana allows the state to tax the drug, producing revenue that can be directed to remarkable programs, including a mental health initiative in Eagle County1. In Pueblo, 563 students were given scholarships of up to 2000 dollars from revenue created by an excise tax on marijuana2 in the county.

Furthermore, at a time when our prisons are overcrowded and drug treatment options are lacking — an issue I will work on once elected — the legalization of marijuana allows us to treat cannabis possession as the public health and welfare issue it is, rather than as a criminal justice issue. Jeff Sessions’ attempted crackdown3 on marijuana legalization challenges the authority of states to make individual decisions on what’s right for them, and threatens Colorado’s sovereignty.

We need an Attorney General who recognizes the nuances of this issue and understands the benefits Colorado has experienced in the wake of cannabis legalization. I will:
  • Protect Colorado’s sovereignty against federal overreach4, ensuring that our right to decide how we legislate and manage marijuana remains in our hands.
  • Consider effective uses of tax revenue, using the models established in Eagle and Pueblo to drive innovative initiatives in other counties.
  • Work with law enforcement officers across the state to ensure that the expected benefits of legalized marijuana — less crowded prisons and ensuring that cannabis users stay out of the criminal justice system — are experienced to the fullest extent.
  • Defend the rights of counties to decide for themselves how to manage marijuana. As a parallel to Colorado’s stance with the federal government, counties know their local economies and issues best. They should have the right to decide how to manage cannabis and I will work with them to help them do so.
We need an Attorney General who recognizes the nuances of this issue and understands the benefits Colorado has experienced in the wake of cannabis legalization. I will:
  • Protect Colorado’s sovereignty against federal overreach4, ensuring that our right to decide how we legislate and manage marijuana remains in our hands.
  • Consider effective uses of tax revenue, using the models established in Eagle and Pueblo to drive innovative initiatives in other counties.
  • Work with law enforcement officers across the state to ensure that the expected benefits of legalized marijuana — less crowded prisons and ensuring that cannabis users stay out of the criminal justice system — are experienced to the fullest extent.
  • Defend the rights of counties to decide for themselves how to manage marijuana. As a parallel to Colorado’s stance with the federal government, counties know their local economies and issues best. They should have the right to decide how to manage cannabis and I will work with them to help them do so.